I recently did a poll on Instagram asking my audience (many of them in healthcare) about domain names. With over a thousand responses, I learned that 90% of them did NOT own their own domain!

In the digital era, it’s important to have an “address” on the Internet for people to find you … and not in some creepy, stalkerish way. Domain names are limited, and people are constantly snatching them up to resell at a higher price down the road. These fairly inexpensive investments can be tailored to whatever you want – a small site to host your résumé, start a blog, host an email address (ie, your-name @ your-domain . com), create a page to advertise your business, etc. The possibilities are growing with each year! Saying “Oh, I’m just not tech-savvy enough” is NOT an excuse these days.

Starting in late 2013, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) started rolling out new generic top-level domain (gTLD) names. What does that mean? Well, we’re all familiar with “.com”, “.net”, “.org” style domains. The new gTLDs are much more personalized! Now there are so many other options: .news, .studio, .doctor, .ninja, .xyz, .life… and on and on!

Basic name registration is roughly $10-15 per year although this can scale up if you get certain gTLDs. If you choose to develop it into something like a blog, you’ll need to pay more for hosting. Modern day hosts offer powerful and automated interfaces where one can literally create a blog in a few clicks.

Popular places to register domain names include Domain.com, GoDaddy.com, Namecheap.com, Register.com, and Name.com. Quite frankly, I don’t think it matters where you register your domain just like it doesn’t matter if your home address is 8701 or 8702. What does matter is your host (ie, your home’s foundation and wiring). For this, I strongly recommend SiteGround.

Feel free to drop me a comment with questions and/or recommendations! 🙂

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